Verse of the Day

Friday, April 2, 2010

My Favorite Ethiopian Recipes

Doro Wot
Serves 10
Allow 4 hours to prepare
5-8 lbs. chicken (drumsticks and thighs, skinned)
8 Large onions
5 tsp minced garlic (approximately 10-12 peeled cloves or 2 1/2 tsp. garlic powder)
2 cups Olive Oil (use a fruity, good quality olive oil, not canola oil)
2 tsp grated ginger root (or 1/2 tsp. dried ginger*)
½ cup Berbere* (makes it “medium” spicy; add more or less)
¼ cup Paprika*
2 tsp. Korerima*
2 tsp. Wot Kimem*
2 tsp. salt (I have also used 1-2 tsp.“Better than Bouillon” Chicken Paste)
1-2 cups water (start by adding one, then increase as sauce becomes too thick)
One hard boiled egg per person
*purchase through Ethiopianspices.com or another online Ethiopian store, as these spices taste different than what you can purchase at a US grocery store)
Clean and remove skin from chicken.
EITHER finely chop onions and garlic by hand OR chop onions in quarters and place onion, whole (peeled) garlic cloves, a 1.5 square inch hunk of fresh ginger root with one cup olive oil in a food processor (or chop-mode of blender) and pulverize.
In large, heavy pot, over medium high heat:  add one cup olive oil and onion, garlic, ginger mixture.  Saute until browned.
Add Berbere; stir frequently for 15 minutes.
Add paprika, korerima, wot kimen, salt (or chicken paste), 1 cup water, and chicken.  Stir well; reduce heat and simmer for at least two hours.  Cover.  Continue to very gently stir doro wat, as chicken becomes so tender it falls off bones.  Add more water as necessary to prevent sticking.  Sauce should be medium thick.
Prepare hard boiled eggs; float peeled eggs on top of dish. 
Enjoy with fresh injera, brown rice, or crusty French bread.
When reheating Doro Wat, add water and/or additional olive oil to return stew to medium-thick consistency.

Sega Wot
Serves 8-10
Allow 4 hours to prepare

3 pounds stew meat or stir-fry meat
5 large onions
5 tsp minced garlic (approximately 10-12 peeled cloves or 2 1/2 tsp. garlic powder)
2 cups Olive Oil (use a fruity, good quality olive oil, not canola oil)
2 tsp grated ginger root (or 1/2 tsp. dried ginger*)
¼ cup Berbere
2 tsp. Wot Kimem*
2 tsp. salt (I have also used 1-2 tsp. “Better than Bouillon” Beef Paste)
1-2 cups water (start by adding one, then increase as sauce becomes too thick)
(*purchase through Ethiopianspices.com or another online Ethiopian store, as these spices taste different than what you can purchase at a US grocery store)
EITHER finely chop onions and garlic by hand OR chop onions in quarters and place onion, whole (peeled) garlic cloves, a 1.5 square inch hunk of fresh ginger root with one cup olive oil in a food processor (or chop-mode of blender) and pulverize.
In large, heavy pot, over medium high heat:  add one cup olive oil and onion, garlic, ginger mixture.  Saute until browned.
Add berbere; stir frequently for 15 minutes.
Add wot kimem, salt (or beef paste), and one cup water.  Stir well.  Cover, reduce heat.
Simmer for 2 1/2 to 3 hours, or until stew meat is fork-tender.  Add one cup water or more as needed to prevent sticking and to leave sauce a medium thick consistency.
Serve with fresh injera, brown rice, or crusty French bread.
When reheating Sega Wot, add water and/or olive oil to get stew back to medium-thick consistency.



Alicha Sega Wot
Serves 8-10
Allow 4 hours to prepare

3 pounds stew meat or stir-fry meat
5 large onions
5 tsp minced garlic (approximately 10-12 peeled cloves or 2 1/2 tsp. garlic powder)
2 cups Olive Oil (use a fruity, good quality olive oil, not canola oil)
2 tsp grated ginger root (or 1/2 tsp. dried ginger*)
2 tsp. Turmeric*
2 tsp. Alicha Kimem
2 tsp. salt (I have also used 1-2 tsp. “Better than Bouillon” Beef Paste)
1-2 cups water (start by adding one, then increase as sauce becomes too thick)

(*purchase through Ethiopianspices.com or another online Ethiopian store, as these spices taste different than what you can purchase at a US grocery store)
EITHER finely chop onions and garlic by hand OR chop onions in quarters and place onion, whole (peeled) garlic cloves, a 1.5 square inch hunk of fresh ginger root with one cup olive oil in a food processor (or chop-mode of blender) and pulverize.
In large, heavy pot, over medium high heat:  add one cup olive oil and onion, garlic, ginger mixture.  Saute until browned.
Add tumeric; stir frequently for 15 minutes.
Add alicha kimem, salt (or beef paste), and one cup water.  Stir well.  Cover, reduce heat.
Simmer for 2 1/2 to 3 hours, or until stew meat is fork-tender.  Add one cup water or more as needed to prevent sticking and to leave sauce a medium thick consistency.
Serve with fresh injera, brown rice, or crusty French bread.
When reheating Alicha Sega Wot, add water and/or olive oil to get stew back to medium-thick consistency.



Yeatakilt Wet (Carrot,Cabbage and Potatoes)
Serves 8-10
Allow 1 hour prep time

½ cup Olive Oil, plus extra (good quality, fruity)
2 large onions, sliced or chopped
4-5 large potatoes, peeled and cut into 8 pieces
2 small tomatoes, chopped
6 large carrots, peeled and cut into 2 inch pieces
1 medium green cabbage, washed and sliced into 3inch pieces
2 T grated fresh ginger (or 2½ tsp ginger powder)
2 T minced fresh garlic (or 2½ tsp garlic powder)
1 T Turmeric
1 tsp Cardamom
Salt
Water

Heat ½ cup olive oil in large, non-stick heavy pan.  Add onions and potatoes.  Cook for 5 minutes over medium high heat.  Add tomato and cook for 1 minute.  Add carrots and sliced cabbage; mix well.  Add water and/or a bit of olive oil to pan to prevent sticking.  Cover and continue to stir frequently for about 25 minutes.  Add garlic, ginger, turmeric, cardamom, and salt to taste.  Potatoes should be tender; check before serving.

4 comments:

  1. Mmmmmmmmmmmm :) I love Ethiopian food!!!!!!!! <3 Keep up the VERY good work Mommy!! :)

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  2. Hey Kristen-We are in the process of adopting two little boys from Ethiopia though CHI/YWAM Adoption Ministry. I have been following your blog for a few months and am very interested in talking to you about your experience and what we can expect. I am sure your time is incredibly limited. Please contact me if you are able. Our web site is www.ourafricansons.com. God bless!

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  3. Oooh! Thanks for sharing these recipes! My husband and I have started going out for Ethiopian ever since we decided to adopt in December. We have really fallen in love with all the flavors and now I look forward to trying to make it at home!!

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  4. Hi, I am just starting with Ethiopian food cooking, your recipes sounding very nice! Keep on cooking, many greetings from Bavaria!

    Michi G√ľntner

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